All Posts Tagged: trade war

Investment Insights: GDP, some like it hot!

Wade Balliet
Posted by Wade Balliet
Investment Strategy

This weekly report presents insights from our Global Investment Management team.

Continued optimism in earnings and a sizzling GDP growth number in the U.S. have urged domestic stock markets even higher.

Crowd sitting in urban public park at lunchtime in the sun.After gaining almost 4% in July, the S&P 500 has wavered in the latter part of the month due to some key companies disappointing investors; however, the gauge is nearing its all-time high from January this year. Facebook, Twitter, and others saw significant declines after their earnings calls, despite beating earnings estimates. Even though a few name brands have fallen, most companies are still performing well. Of the 325 companies that have reported so far, close to 90% have beaten earnings estimates, and the group remains on track to grow profits by around 24% over last quarter, according to data aggregated by Bloomberg. On top of a robust earnings season, the U.S. saw one of its strongest quarterly growth numbers in recent history.

The Commerce Department reported that the U.S. economy grew at a 4.1% pace in the second quarter, a notable acceleration from the 2.2% growth in the first quarter and the fastest rate since 2014. While President Trump has called the tempo “very sustainable” and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin told Fox News that, “…we definitely are in a period of four or five years of sustained 3% growth at least,” investors and economists don’t seem to be as optimistic. The combination of fading positive effects from tax cuts, increasing risks from tariffs and global trade, a stronger U.S. dollar, and rising rates from the Fed may end up weighing on growth going forward. However, the Trump administration is continuing to do everything in its power to keep the party going. The Treasury Department is considering a $100B tax cut via adjusting capital gains taxes for inflation, according to reports from the New York Times, which will likely benefit the wealthiest taxpayers.

Additional fiscal policy changes to help boost growth are something the Federal Reserve will need to watch closely to ensure the economy doesn’t overheat. The Fed will conclude its two-day meeting today, checking off one of its last policy meetings for the year. According to Bloomberg’s fed funds futures data, the market is still expecting two more rate hikes this year, with an 88% probability of a hike at the September meeting. The Bank of Japan confirmed it will maintain its post-crisis easy monetary policy, but has added a few tweaks to longer term rate goals, and the Bank of England is projected to raise rates at its meeting on Thursday.

Geopolitical risk seems to be waning, at least in the eyes of investors. The Twitter feeds and public declarations between the U.S. and China on additional tariffs have quieted down but remain a notable risk. Our team continues to be optimistic toward the prospect of negotiation between the U.S. and its trading partners. Separately, we see a growing risk in emerging markets as the U.S. dollar strengthens and China’s growth may be showing signs of further slowing. For now, we are enjoying the robust economic and financial data over the near term, but have acknowledged it may not be sustainable.

Chart showing various market returns as of 7/31/18
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Investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal and fluctuation in value. Economic and market forecasts reflect subjective judgments and assumptions, and unexpected events may occur. Therefore, there can be no assurance that developments will transpire as forecasted. The information in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be investment advice or a recommendation. Nothing in this newsletter should be interpreted to state or imply that past results are an indication of future performance.

Fixed income securities are subject to interest rate, inflation, credit and default risk. The bond market is volatile. As interest rates rise, bond prices usually fall, and vice versa. The return of principal is not guaranteed, and prices may decline if an issuer fails to make timely payments or its credit strength weakens.

International securities involve additional risks such as currency fluctuations, differing financial accounting standards, and possible political and economic instability. These risks are greater in emerging markets.

Diversification and asset allocation do not ensure a profit or guarantee against loss.

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Investment Insights: What’s got bond markets in a huff?

Wade Balliet
Posted by Wade Balliet
Investment Strategy
Close up on Wall St. street sign, with tourists enjoying the street in summer weather behind it.

Corporate earnings continue to be supportive and a bright spot for financial markets.

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Investment Insights: Don’t eat sour grapes

Wade Balliet
Posted by Wade Balliet
Investment Strategy
Large black marble wall that says "Shanghai Stock Exchange" outside the actual exchange building.

If these added tariffs were to go into effect, the U.S. would be raising import prices on about half of all goods imported from China.

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Instant Analysis: June payrolls surprise to the upside, but wage growth disappoints

Scott Anderson
Chief Economist
Crowded crosswalk full of morning professionals walking to work as the sun shines through the crowd.

June’s job numbers keep the Goldilocks story of this economic expansion alive.

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Investment Insights: Is the grand finale coming?

Wade Balliet
Posted by Wade Balliet
Investment Strategy
Multiple fireworks exploding into colorful bursts in a night sky over a California coastal town.

What many are volleying back and forth is whether the financial market is just searching for footing before another leg upward or if this may be a last hurrah before a more portentous drop.

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